Community

PHOTO PROVIDED
Penn College physical therapist assistant student Kathleen L. Carey, of Montoursville, assesses the deep tendon reflexes of classmate Angela M. Cipolla, of Williamsport.

PA College of technology adds Physical Therapist Assistant degree

WILLIAMSPORT — Pennsylvania College of Technology welcomed the first class of students into its new Physical Therapist Assistant Program this spring, following a semester of prerequisite coursework. The two-year degree program culminates in an Associate of Applied Science degree; students ...

New Love Center serves 396 families in January

JERSEY SHORE — In the month of January, The New Love Center Food Pantry 229 S. Broad St., Jersey Shore, served 396 families, distributing food to feed 953 people in our coverage area, with 286 volunteers donating 1,063 hours. The pantry received 2,563 pounds of donated food, including702 ...

Sunrise 2-17

Cub Scouts cross over into Troop 54

PHOTO PROVIDED Cub Scouts cross over into Troop 54 At left, Seven Scouts from Pack 54 of Beech Creek - Blanchard crossed over into Troop 54. Each was awarded custom-made Arrow of Light plaques specific to their years in Scouting. From left are Wyatt Wilson, Jonathon Killinger, Aiden ...

SENIOR CENTER MENUS

Bread available daily Monday — Chicken ala king with buttermilk biscuit, lemon pepper broccoli, carrot and raisin salad. Tuesday — Chicken alfredo with fettuccine noodles and creamy parmesan sauce, peas with mushrooms, apple. Wednesday — Grande chili con carne with tomatoes and ...

FINDING SUPPORT

HEALTH r Covenant Cafe, a social engagement program for people in the early stages of Alzheimer’s — 1-3 p.m. Tuesday (first and third Tuesdays of the month), Covenant United Methodist Church, 44 W. Main St., Lock Haven. Information: Fran Decker, 570-748-4302. GRIEF r GriefShare — 7 ...

TAKE THE STEPS TO RECOVERY

Editor’s note: Groups listed below focus on recovery from addiction, and the meetings are open to the general public, unless otherwise indicated. Al-Anon is for friends and family members of addicts, and Romans 12:2 is for people battling addiction and their families. — — — ...

Centre Library to host ukulele workshop

BELLEFONTE — The Centre County Library and Historical Museum at 200 Allegheny St. (the corner of Howard Street) is hosting a “Ukulele Crash Course” next month, a beginner’s workshop for ukulele players offered by the Allegheny Ukulele Kollective. The workshop will be held from 6 to 7 ...

The Carpenter Farm Family Of Linden Shop For Pumpkin Seed For The Upcoming Growing Season At The Mafvcs Trade Show. From Left Are Edith Carpenter, A Harris Seeds Representative, John And Zach Carpenter.

By ELLEN KNICKMEYER Associated Press Communities just downstream of California’s Lake Oroville dam would not receive adequate warning or time for evacuations if the 770-foot-tall dam itself — rather than its spillways — were to abruptly fail, the state water agency that operates the nation’s tallest dam repeatedly advised federal regulators a half-decade ago. The state Department of Water Resources informed federal dam regulators that local emergency officials “do not believe there is enough time to perform evacuations in the communities immediately downstream of the dam during a sudden failure,” according to a Feb. 8, 2011, letter reviewed by The Associated Press. Absent “significant” advance warning, emergency responders instead would likely withdraw to safer ground and prepare for victims, said the same letter by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which oversees safety of hydroelectric dams, in a summary of the state’s conclusions. The catastrophic scenario of a sudden breach at California’s second-largest water reservoir, outlined between 2010 and 2012 in online archives of federal dam regulators, is a different and far graver situation than the concern that prompted sudden evacuation orders Sunday for 188,000 downstream residents. In an email Thursday, state water agency spokesman Ed Wilson said that despite the repeated back-and-forth correspondence by state and federal officials about reducing detection- and response time to allow for evacuations downstream in the event of Oroville dam’s sudden failure, the scenario was “hypothetical” and “not how dams typically fail in real life.” Late Sunday afternoon, operators of the nearly half-century-old dam in California’s Sierra Nevada foothills became alarmed that the water cascading from the reservoir after a series of winter storms could roar uncontrolled down a rapidly eroding emergency spillway toward towns downstream. They ordered residents of parts of three counties to leave. Despite the troubles with the dam’s flood-control spillways, authorities have stressed that they do not believe the dam itself is threatened. Sunday’s precautionary evacuation order was eased by mid-week to allow people to return to the 16,000-resident town of Oroville and other communities. The federal-state discussion about the worst-case scenario over the years highlights steps that California’s water agency and others still should take to do more to improve warning and escape for people downstream, say local officials and a Florida-based evacuation expert. Those measures include widening the entirety of a mixed two- and four-lane state highway leading away from Oroville and other communities and doing more to improve public-warning systems. The federal dam regulators also called for annual “public education…that describes what residents should do during an emergency” at the dam. As it was, some families who leaped into their cars to flee on Sunday found themselves caught in traffic jams hours later in the path of potential danger. “People were just panicking,” said Nancy Borsdorf of Oroville, who grabbed two Bibles and a Christian-music CD to take with her after friends phoned to urge her to go. “‘Get out of town, the dam is going to blow.'” Many public officials and ordinary people rushed to help direct traffic or to settle the evacuees streaming into shelters. But evacuees also described seeing families abandoning cars, and even watching fistfights on gridlocked roads. The federal government in recent years has made evacuation and emergency-response plans for major dams off-limit information for the public, for fear details could be exploited for terror attacks or hacking. California officials cited that reason this week in declining to release the latest emergency plans for the dam. Wilson, the state Department of Water Resources spokesman, said authorities have implemented the reverse-911 automated warnings recommended by federal regulators, and also activated an emergency broadcast system locally. Residents confirmed the reverse-911 system worked Sunday. With months left in the rainy season, state spokesperson Nancy Vogel said California now has drones, cameras and human lookouts watching the dam and its spillways. Operators have been releasing torrents of water down the damaged main spillway to try to make sure the water does not pour over the emergency spillway as it did last weekend. Even with round-the-clock efforts by dam operators, Oroville Mayor Linda Dahlmeier immediately began praying for those closer to the dam when she heard the first drops of rain hit the metal roof of her home Thursday. “You just start bawling,” Dahlmeier said. “This is Mother Nature’s hand.” Oroville used to have civil-defense sirens for emergencies, Dahlmeier thought, but funds for such public expenses have dwindled in the foothill counties. Neither she nor others recalled the annual safety briefings for the public that federal regulators urged of the state water agency. “You know what the evacuation plan is? ‘Get the hell out of town!'” said Kevin Zeitler, a critic of the state water agency’s interactions with communities downstream of the dam. Zeitler was staying put at his office in Oroville’s vulnerable downtown, but keeping his pickup truck out front fully packed. Since the 1990s, Oroville and other communities in Butte County have asked the state for the $300 million it would take to widen the full route of a key highway out of the county from two lanes to four, said Jon Clark, head of the Butte County Association of Governments. Unquestionably, that would have helped in the evacuations, Clark and others said. For Butte County’s many low-income retirees and others unable to drive, Clark’s association got buses on the road Sunday to carry people to safety. In a disaster as sudden as a major problem with a dam, authorities will have had warning signs telling them to increase their vigilance, even if that is just forecasts of storms coming, said John Renne, an urban-planning professor at Florida Atlantic University. And the public can almost always be warned, even if it entails greater government investment in public-warning technology. “Minutes can save lives,” Renne said.

January for Pennsylvania vegetable growers means only one thing: participating in the largest meeting and trade show for growers on the East Coast. More than a thousand growers attended this year’s Mid-Atlantic Fruit and Vegetable Conference in Hershey. I did see some of our local growers ...

Robb 74-75 3rd grade

Robb third graders in 1974-75 identified

PHOTO PROVIDED We thank readers Judy (Seyler) Fox, Sara (Dorman) Neese, Wanda (Aikey) Andrews and Rosey Spangler who have identified the people in this photo showing third graders at Robb Elementary School in 1974-75. They are, from left, in front: Sylvia Probst, Judith Marie Seyler, Sean ...

Reunions ahead

FEB. 23 — LHHS Class of 1964 dinner, 6 p.m., Browns Hill Tavern. All classmates and friends are invited. Reservations to Donna Barton 570-748-6821 or Bonnie Young 570-748-5680. FEB. 23 — Hammermill “office girls” reunion dinner, 5 p.m., Ruby Tuesdays. MARCH 1 — LHHS Class of 1948 ...

Meetings next week

Monday r Clinton County Commissioners, 9 a.m. r Wayne Township Supervisors, 7 p.m. r Bellefonte Borough Council, 7 p.m. Tuesday r Centre County Commissioners, 10 a.m. r Woodward Township Supervisors, 7 p.m. r Clinton County Planning Commission, 7 p.m. Thursday r Clinton County ...

Blood drives

TODAY — Crossroads Community Church, 1454 South State Route 44 Highway, Jersey Shore, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. TUESDAY — Boggs Township Community Building, 1290 Runville Road, Bellefonte, 12:30-6 p.m. FRIDAY — American Philatelic Society, 100 Match Factory Place, Bellefonte, noon-5:30 ...

Howard Happenings

YARD & BAKE SALE To get you in the mood for warmer weather, there will be an indoor yard and bake sale at Curtin United Methodist Church today, Feb. 18, from 8-4 and tomorrow from 8-2. Donations of clothes, books and many household items have been collected for the yard sale. There ...

Harry Colebourn with Winnie the bear - Salisbury Plain.  Alternate.

Winnie the Pooh movie planned

Winnipeg, or Winnie, is a black bear adopted by Canadian Regimental Veterinarian Harry Colebourn in 1914 and named after his hometown in Manitoba. Winnie accompanied Colebourn when he was shipped to England for service in World War One and became the beloved mascot of the Canadian ...

Harter

CPI alum visits classroom

CPI alumnus Beccah Harter recently visited her former instructor, Erin Gearhart, to give a presentation to the class. The 2016 graduate of the Early Childhood Education program is a Personal Care Aide for Easter Seals and returned to discuss various skills and professional procedures ...

KARISCHLEGELCHECK2

Centre Crest remembers Kari Schlegel

On Dec. 15, 2016, the Centre Crest Culinary Services department lost dear friend and coworker Kari Schlegel to a fatal car accident. In response to this tragedy, her department wanted to do something special for Kari’s family and the scholarship fund has been created in her ...

Barnum postcards C

Standing Rock

PHOTO PROVIDED This postcard, lent to The Express by Western Clinton County historian Charles Barnum, shows Standing Rock in Paddy’s Run. The legend of Standing Rock is that native Americans used it as a lookout, Barnum said. The area also boasts Altar Rock, which is in West Renovo.

B Elks team fundraiser

Bellefonte Elks invest in community

PHOTOS PROVIDED Bellefonte Elks Lodge #1094 recently raised nearly $7,500 for the Elks Home Service Program with an auction and “horse races” fundraiser, attended by almost 150 people. The Home Service Program provides in-home nursing services to clients with spina bifida, multiple ...

Masonic tree

Masons grateful for new Christmas tree

Members of LaFayette # 199 Lodge are seen around a beautifully decorated Christmas tree that was donated to the lodge by Mill Hall WalMart. The membership said an older tree had seen better days and they are thankful for WalMart’s generosity. The tree was used for holiday ...

Meeting the author

Meeting the author

Clark Packer, son of Robin and Gerald Packer of Beech Creek, meets author Daria Baron-Hall who shows him a copy of her book “Only at the Children’s Table.” Clark was a student in Miss Michelen Rich’s fourth grade class in the early 1990s. Anyone who knows the year and the place the ...