Why health care eats more of your paycheck every year

(AP) — Millions of Americans are finding out this month that the price of their health insurance is going up next year — as it did this year, last year, and most of the years before that.

And it’s not just that the price is going up, it’s that it goes up faster than wages and inflation, eating away at our ability to pay for other things we want (beer, televisions, vacations) or need (rent, heat, food).

Does it have to be this way? Why does health care grow so much faster than almost any other spending category so consistently? And will it ever stop?

“At some point it’s not going to be worth it to have less food, less travel in order to spend money on health care,” said Louise Sheiner, a health economist at the Brookings Institution. “That’s what really stops it.”

Insurance premiums, which reflect spending on medicines, doctor visits, tests and hospital stays, have climbed 213 percent since 1999 for family coverage purchased through an employer, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation, which studies health care. Wages, by comparison, have risen 60 percent, while inflation is up 44 percent.

Here’s why the price of health care doesn’t grow like, say, the price of dishwashers or blue jeans — and why that’s unlikely to change anytime soon.

IT’S HARD TO SHOP FOR HEALTH CARE

Insurers and employers have been trying for years to make patients better health care shoppers and force doctors and hospitals to compete on price. They’ve raised deductibles or out-of-pocket costs on coverage and given tools to patients so they can compare prices and quality.

The idea is that patients become more motivated to price shop when they first have to pay several hundred dollars toward the bill due to a high deductible. Many see this push as a key to curbing health care spending, since insurance tends to hide the full cost of care from the patient.

This can work … for small stuff, said Renya Spak of the benefits consultant Mercer. Patients will shop if they need an MRI exam on their shoulder. But Spak isn’t convinced it will do much for things like surgeries, when the insurer or employer will wind up covering much of the bill anyway and the best deal might involve travel away from family.

“It’s not human nature to be rational thinkers about health care cost decisions,” she added. “It will never be just like buying a lawnmower.”

Consumers also prioritize health care purchases over other buying decisions, especially if they have basics like food and shelter covered. You’ll have back surgery to alleviate chronic pain before you take that long-awaited trip to Paris.

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