Short sighted or blinded by money

FREDERICK BUCHEIT

Mill Hall

A letter writer from Doylestown (Tax cuts are working, Sept. 1) claims that Donald Trump’s tax cuts have been good for the economy and that his business and others are doing well because of it.

Well, that is half of the story.

The other half is that, while business owners are doing well, the average wage of a worker has not changed much for 25 years — except that is for the owners and CEOs.

They are making fortunes.

Apparently, the letter writer subscribes to the old trickle-down theory, and a theory is all it is.

The funny thing is that that theory has been proven false about a dozen times in the past 30 years. Apparently people forget.

What trickles down is the dregs and slop that adds nothing to those at or near the bottom.

In fact, the middle class has not seen a raise in 30 years.

Cutting taxes when the country is $21 trillion in debt is economic suicide.

Sure, it boosts some business … temporarily, no different than if you or I take out a loan and start spending irresponsibly.

Eventually that chicken comes home to roost.

Tax cuts may be good for a few in the short run, but this country will not get its financial house in order until we accept the reality that we must act regarding what is good for the country, not just what is good for some of us.

Selfishness is the root of a lot of sorrow.

It would be very interesting to know how much Donald Trump’s fortune and the fortunes of his friends benefited from the tax cuts.

We will never know because Trump will not divulge that information as good ethics require.

He, apparently, is above the law.

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