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Taxes, taxes, taxes

WELDON C. COHICK JR.

Linden

I am an 87-year-old Korean War Veteran and a life long resident of Piatt Township. My father, myself and my two brothers have contributed roughly 24 years of military service through active and reserve military during our lives.

We were drafted or enlisted in the military.

Half of the male population in our country have never dedicated themselves to serve their country because the challenge was met by volunteers who chose to enlist.

During the World War II our father, who had a wife and six small children, was drafted into the Army.

We received roughly $2,000 a year from the government to survive on while living in a home without a cellar, no bathroom, no telephone, no electricity, no running water or no automobile.

We had to pay property and school taxes. In this day and age many of the retired elderly of this country are receiving a yearly income way below the poverty level of our country.

Our state and federal governments are helping the elderly of this country in different ways. In most cases this financial help is annulled because of ridiculous pay raises given almost yearly to the very people who we elect into office to represent us.

An example of such behavior appeared in the newspaper when the director of a regional water and sanitary agency was approved for a nearly $3,000 salary increase, from $130,000 to $132,860.

This is one of the many reasons why taxes and fees keep going up. Prices, too, are going sky high. Here is a my list:

5 A single cupcake $1.

5 Potato chips $8 a pound

5 Some lunch meats are nearly $10 a pound.

5 Dozens of dinners and lunches at many restaurants average $15 a meal, $3 or $4 for a milk shake, barbeque sandwich with French fries $10.

5 Fill up your gas tank for $50.

Thousands of Social Security recipients are forced to survive on an income of $30 a day or $900 a month.

For anyone who thinks they should have a $2,860 raise a year with an income already at $130,000 a year, they should bow their heads in shame, regardless of who they are or what they represent.

For those who may think that I am nothing but a complainer, I ask what they think about athletes who sign contracts worth million of dollars a year for many years.

A recent article said a player for the Philadelphia 76ers agreed to a $170 million, 5-year deal.

This player will make about $8.1 million this season. These highfalutin individuals are pretentious, bombastic and they live a very extravagant life, as do most of our elected officials who I believe have little concern for working class Americans, much less for the retired elderly.

I opened a savings account in Jersey Shore in 1951 when I entered the United State Air Force. That was 68 years ago. I retired at age 62 and I am now 87 years of age.

With the inflation rate rising over the next 25 years like it did, some time after retiring I was forced to close my life’s saving account. I must wait until the third of every month for my Social Security check so I can pay my bills.

The cost of living has skyrocketed. Groceries, automobiles, taxes, gasoline and everything else have become unaffordable for many.

For retired senior citizens whose yearly incomes are limited to Social Security, I say they should be exonerated from paying property and school taxes on their homes.

This problem is being partially addressed in our state but not completely. I retired 25 years ago and I was milked out of roughly $2,400 a year for these two taxes, or roughly $60,000.

I am proud to be an American but I disagree with how we treat our senior citizens.

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