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Health

Colonoscopy can save your life

More than 140,000 new cases of colon cancer are diagnosed each year, making it the third most common cancer and the second-leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. However, when caught early it is highly treatable. Screening saves lives as it helps catch cancer early and the gold standard for ...

UPMC welcomes new nurse midwife

WILLIAMSPORT — UPMC has welcomed Jessica Callahan, MSN, CNM, WHNP-BC, to the care team at SH OB/GYN in Williamsport. Callahan is a certified nurse midwife and board-certified women’s health care nurse practitioner. She received her master’s degree in nursing from Yale University School ...

Health panel expands lung cancer screening for more smokers

More Americans now qualify for yearly scans to detect lung cancer, according to guidelines released Tuesday that may help more Black smokers and women get screened. Lung cancer is the nation’s top cancer killer, causing more than 135,000 deaths each year. Smoking is the chief cause and ...

UPMC unveils special response vehicle

WILLIAMSPORT— On Tuesday, Feb. 23, representatives from UPMC, Susquehanna Regional EMS, and the PPL Foundation unveiled UPMC’s Special Response Vehicle, a new resource for emergency response in northcentral Pennsylvania. “Today has been a long time coming for our region,” said Jim ...

COVID-19 vaccine and mammograms

Many questions exist about COVID-19 vaccines and to get to the facts, it’s important to understand how the vaccines work and affect the body. The most common side effects are muscle aches, fatigue, soreness at the injection site, headache, and fever. These short-term side effects typically ...

Nevada lawsuit alleges baby food makers sell toxic products

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Four baby food makers were accused Wednesday in Nevada state court of producing baby food tainted with toxic metals and harming at least seven Las Vegas children who were diagnosed with autism. Attorneys Will Kemp and Robert Eglet said the basis for their lawsuit was a Feb. ...

Simple ways to thank local nurses

METRO — Nurses have long been unsung heroes of the medical community. But that tide began to turn in 2020 as the world confronted the COVID-19 pandemic and realized just how invaluable nurses are to public health. According to the American Nurses Association, nearly 400 nurses in the United ...

The pains of working from home

When the pandemic started almost a year ago, many people weren’t sure how to manage their daily lives as lock-down orders essentially turned homes into offices, schools, and gyms. As the restrictions loosened up, some companies began to open offices again, however, others are still ...

COVID-19 and Pregnancy

For expecting parents, there’s nothing quite like the anticipation of bringing new life into the world. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has caused additional concerns for women who are pregnant, have recently delivered a baby, or are breast-feeding. While there’s a lot of information out ...

COVID-19 course tracks system pandemic response in real time

SCRANTON — When COVID-19 swept the globe, it caught the collective health care world off guard. While the national news was largely fixated on the bath tissue shortage, health systems were scrambling to shore up their supply of personal protective equipment and other infection-control ...

Amid COVID-19 pandemic, flu has disappeared in the US

NEW YORK (AP) — February is usually the peak of flu season, with doctors’ offices and hospitals packed with suffering patients. But not this year. Flu has virtually disappeared from the U.S., with reports coming in at far lower levels than anything seen in decades. Experts say that ...

Why experts say a good mood can lead to good health

It doesn’t take a scientist to understand that laughter feels good, while anger feels awful. But it does take one to explain why one of these feelings can boost the immune system, while the other can wear it down, damage the heart and increase the risk for dementia. Simply put: “Mood ...

Lifesaving heart valve replacement treatment

The aortic valve is the exit door of the heart and all of the oxygen-rich blood that keeps us alive is pumped through it. Without fail, this door bends open every time the heart beats, roughly 80 times per minute since the day we were born, and closes again as the heart refills. Unfortunately, ...

UPMC publication wins Paper of the Year Award

PITTSBURGH —UPMC Health Plan has received the prestigious American Journal of Health Promotion “Papers of the Year from 2020 Award” for its “Impact of Physician Referral” outcomes study, the company announced today. The study evaluated the impact of leveraging the credibility of the ...

What is next for hearing aids?

At the beginning of this new year I was invited to a live online launch of a new hearing aid product. The company issuing me the invitation called it NEXT. I wondered humorously, what would be after NEXT? I mean how can you call a product NEXT and ever have any suitable names for other products ...

Side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine

Whether you experience some or all of the most common side effects from the COVID-19 vaccine, they’re completely normal, and managing them is easier than you might think. Here’s what you need to know. A different type of vaccination The COVID-19 vaccine is given in two doses, ...

Mount Nittany earns ACR ultrasound accreditation for 21st year

STATE COLLEGE —Mount Nittany Medical Center has earned a three-year term of reaccreditation in ultrasound as the result of an extensive review by the American College of Radiology (ACR) for the 21st consecutive year. “I am proud of our imaging services department to be able to meet these ...

Lower your sodium, and blood pressure will follow

Reducing sodium intake by any amount can lower blood pressure over the long term — and may benefit everyone, including people with normal blood pressure, new research shows. While the link between consuming less-salty foods and lower blood pressure is well established, researchers wanted to ...

What’s mRNA and how is it used in COVID vaccines?

The COVID-19 vaccines that have been given Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) by the FDA use something called mRNA to cause an immune response to COVID-19. This is different from most vaccines you’re probably familiar with — like the flu vaccine, which uses a protein from the virus itself. ...

Treating COVID-19: What are monoclonal antibodies?

The use of monoclonal antibodies in healthcare isn’t new. In fact, doctors have been using them for decades in the treatment of certain illnesses, such as cancer. Now, they’re being used to treat people infected with COVID-19 who are at a high risk of severe illness — and early results ...